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    U.S. HISTORY

     

    Instructor: Mr. Dotzler

    Fall Semester 2017

    United States History to 1877

    Class Time: 10:52-11:52 M-F

    Office/Room: p102

    Telephone: 210-658-6394

    Email: bdotzler@fbauc.com

     

    CATALOG DESCRIPTION

    Hist 1301 is a survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

     

    PURPOSE

    History 1301 studies the broader questions and trends in American History. We will learn certain historical facts, but understanding theory also enhances our ability to analyze both the continuity and the jolting changes that mark our history.

     

    COURSE OUTCOMES (STUDENT LEARNING OJBECTIVES – SLO’S)

    1. Create an argument through the use of historical evidence.
    2. Analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources.
    3. Analyze the effects of historical, social, political, economic, cultural, and global forces on this period of United States history.

     

    CORE OBJECTIVES

    1. Critical thinking skills to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information

     

    1. Communication skills to include effective written, oral, and visual communication

     

    1. Team Work to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal
    1. Personal Responsibility to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making
    1. Social Responsibility to include intercultural competency, civic knowledge, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities

    REQUIRED MATERIALS

    The American Promise: A History of the United States, 4th ed.

     

    PLAGIARISM AND CHEATING

    See school handbook.

     

    ELECTRONIC DEVICES POLICY

    No electronic devices of any kind may be used during class time without instructor approval. This includes laptop computers, cell phones, smart phones, Bluetooth devices, MP3 players, etc. Please turn off all devices during the class period. Students whose cell phones ring during class will have their phones confiscated.

     

    PREPARATION FOR CLASS:

    The nature of this course necessitates that reading assignments be completed prior to class. We will be covering two chapters between tests, and I will proceed at a pace that assumes you have read the material and are prepared to ask and answer questions during class. Students should be prepared for a pop-quiz on the daily readings.

     

    GRADE DISTRIBUTION:

    Tests / Essays                                 50%

    Quizzes / Presentations                30%

    Daily Assignments                         10%

    Homework                                      10%

     

    TESTS

    Students can expect 4 tests per grading period. Each test will cover two chapters. Tests will always be scheduled on a Friday; thus, students must manage their preparation time accordingly.

     

    QUIZZES

    Students can expect 1 or 2 quizzes per chapter and a weekly geography quiz every Wednesday. Pop quizzes can be expected daily.

     

    ESSAYS

    There will be a heavy emphasis on writing during this course. Students can expect to write a 300-500 word essay every other week on assigned topics. These writing assignments should be formatted as a standard five-paragraph essay with a thesis statement, three supporting elements, and conclusion.

     

    PRESENTATIONS

    Each student will be required to select a topic pertaining to U.S. History and make a presentation. The in-class presentation should be 3-5 minutes long. The topic must be approved by the instructor. Students may use power point but the slides should be limited to pictures and bullet comments. Do not write a paragraph and simply read it to the class. These assignments are designed for the students to teach the class.

     

    HOMEWORK

    Because this is a college level course, students can expect to spend on average about one hour per night (five hours per week) on preparation and homework.

     

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY DOCUMENTS:

    Students will analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources.

     

    ADDITIONAL READING

    Dual Credit students will be assigned two additional books during the year (one per semester) and respond to each in the form of a books review and/or book summary.