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    WORLD HISTORY

     

    Instructor:  Mr. Dotzler

    Contact Information:

    210-658-5331

    bdotzler@fbauc.com

    briandotzler@gmail.com

    www.mrdhistory.com

     

    Course Description

    The World History course spans over 6,000 years. Thus, there is a great deal of material to cover but not a lot of time to do so. Therefore, it is imperative that students not only arrive to class on time but also come prepared. Students are required to bring the following items everyday:

    Textbook, Bible, notebook, black or blue ink pen, and a pencil.

     

    I will post schedules, important dates, notes, history terms, website links, etc. to my website (www.mrdhistory.com). Be sure to check the calendar daily and email me with any questions or concerns. I will respond to any and all emails within 24-hours just to let you know that I did in fact receive your message. If you have not heard back from me within 24 hours, please do not hesitate to send another or to contact me through the school office.

     

    Textbook: World History, 3rd edition. (bju press)

     

    Expectations & Homework:

    “Will there be homework every night?” Yes! You can expect to have an assignment nightly. However, this is no cause for alarm. Most of the “homework” assigned is reading in order to prepare for the next day’s discussion. Please manage your time wisely.

     

    I anticipate never wasting a precious second of class; there simply are not enough of them. At all times we will be moving forward, and I expect my students to walk out of each class more knowledgeable than they were when they entered. Due to the nature of history and its close relationship to current events, we should expect to stray off topic and venture into other topics. In fact, I encourage students to come to class with questions and comments that pertain to our daily lives so that we can engage in lively discussions and debates. Hopefully, we will be able to tie these current events to the events we read about in history.

     

    Grades

    Tests/Essays: These will be averaged together and count 50%.

    Quizzes, homework, classwork, class discussions: These will be averaged and count 50%.

     

    Pop-quizzes:

    In order to assure that the students are keeping up with the daily reading, they should expect a pop-quiz everyday.

     

    Quizzes:

    Expect at least one quiz per week.

     

    Essays:

    Students should expect to write a 250+ word essay every other week. These essays will be in response to a prompt (an article, current event, etc) that I assign in class. Each essay will require the following:

    • A well developed thesis statement. This tells the reader what you are setting out to prove. For example: The Roman Empire disintegrated due to factors relating to economics, military defense, and political corruption. From this point, the student should write at least one paragraph that deals with each of the reasons.
    • Each paragraph should contain a good topic sentence that supports the thesis statement. For example: Rome’s use of mercenaries to defend her borders weakened the empire. (From this point, the student can write a few sentences explaining how and why.)
    • A conclusion that sums up the essay.

     

    These essays may be difficult to write initially, but as the year goes by students should soon find themselves writing them with little effort. It is vitally important that a student can choose a topic and write confidently about that topic.

    Instructor:  Mr. Dotzler
    Contact Information:

    210-658-5331

    bdotzler@fbauc.com

    briandotzler@gmail.com

    www.mrdhistory.com

    Course Description

    The World History course spans over 6,000 years. Thus, there is a great deal of material to cover but not a lot of time to do so. Therefore, it is imperative that students not only arrive to class on time but also come prepared. Students are required to bring the following items everyday:

    Textbook, Bible, notebook, black or blue ink pen, and a pencil.

    I will post schedules, important dates, notes, history terms, website links, etc. to my website (www.mrdhistory.com). Be sure to check the calendar daily and email me with any questions or concerns. I will respond to any and all emails within 24-hours just to let you know that I did in fact receive your message. If you have not heard back from me within 24 hours, please do not hesitate to send another or to contact me through the school office.

    Textbook: World History, 3rd edition. (bju press)

    Expectations & Homework:

    “Will there be homework every night?” Yes! You can expect to have an assignment nightly. However, this is no cause for alarm. Most of the “homework” assigned is reading in order to prepare for the next day’s discussion. Please manage your time wisely.

    I anticipate never wasting a precious second of class; there simply are not enough of them. At all times we will be moving forward, and I expect my students to walk out of each class more knowledgeable than they were when they entered. Due to the nature of history and its close relationship to current events, we should expect to stray off topic and venture into other topics. In fact, I encourage students to come to class with questions and comments that pertain to our daily lives so that we can engage in lively discussions and debates. Hopefully, we will be able to tie these current events to the events we read about in history.

    Grades

    Tests/Essays: These will be averaged together and count 50%.

    Quizzes, homework, classwork, class discussions: These will be averaged and count 50%.

    Pop-quizzes:

    In order to assure that the students are keeping up with the daily reading, they should expect a pop-quiz everyday.

    Quizzes:

    Expect at least one quiz per week.

    Essays:

    Students should expect to write a 250+ word essay every other week. These essays will be in response to a prompt (an article, current event, etc) that I assign in class. Each essay will require the following:

    • A well developed thesis statement. This tells the reader what you are setting out to prove. For example: The Roman Empire disintegrated due to factors relating to economics, military defense, and political corruption. From this point, the student should write at least one paragraph that deals with each of the reasons.
    • Each paragraph should contain a good topic sentence that supports the thesis statement. For example: Rome’s use of mercenaries to defend her borders weakened the empire. (From this point, the student can write a few sentences explaining how and why.)
    • A conclusion that sums up the essay.

    These essays may be difficult to write initially, but as the year goes by students should soon find themselves writing them with little effort. It is vitally important that a student can choose a topic and write confidently about that topic.